This course provides the vocabulary, theory, principles, and hands-on experience to support the practical, clinical and technical requirements of programs that require knowledge of human systems. The interrelationships of body systems are presented so that the human body is studied as an integrated whole and emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease. Topics include: revision of cell theory; cell structure, metabolism, reproduction; levels of organization; study of the normal histology; gross anatomy; physiology of body tissues; integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems; interrelationship and integration of body systems homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease.

This course provides the vocabulary, theory, principles, and hands-on experience to support the practical, clinical, and technical requirements of programs that require knowledge of the human systems. The interrelationships of body systems are presented so that the human body is studied as an integrated whole and emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease. Topics include: anatomy and physiology of endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, immune, digestive, renal and reproductive systems; integrative homeostatic theories of life support and maintenance.

This course provides an introduction to statistics with an emphasis on the concepts and principles of biostatistics. It assists the student to utilize knowledge and skills in both that are essential for professionals in public health practice and research.

Students will develop skills necessary to conduct basic clinical and public health studies. This will include identifying research questions, determining samples, and study design; conducting literature review; analyzing data, and preparing reports/papers.

This course comprises a study of the Pharmacy Laws of Belize and examination of the ethical responsibilities of the Pharmacist.

This course examines the moral fabric of the human condition, the exploration of self-questioning, and helps students to develop their critical thinking skills in the context of social work practice. Additionally, the ethics of the social work profession are integrated within the field internship and applied to actual cases. Topics include: Code of Ethics; National and International Associations of Social Workers; personal ethics and values; personal values; neutrality and imposing values; guidelines for ethical decision making; privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent; equality, inequality, and limited resources; Civil Liberties and Justice; UN declaration of human rights; ethical dilemma; reserved for program students.
Ethical problems arise whenever and wherever people deal with human lives, human survival and human welfareactivities that social workers are involved in on a daily basis. Ethics and Critical Thinking is a course designed to assist students in analyzing ethical quandaries, to learn techniques in making better ethical decisions and become aware of the ethical aspects of the practice of Social Work in Belize. Students examine current codes of ethics from other countries and present current issues confronting the Belizean society.

This required practice course orients students to the context, theory and practice of macro social work. This course prepares students to use professional knowledge, values, and skills in generalist practice with organizations and communities. Students are introduced to social works historic and current commitment to social change that promotes the well-being of people, with an emphasis on empowering marginalized individuals and advancing social and economic justice. Through interacting with communities, students build skills regarding mutual, collaborative and respectful professional relationships with community members and other professionals. They learn how to assess characteristics, dynamics, strengths, and problems of human service and community-based organizations, service delivery systems. Students examine social work roles and skills used to influence social change and apply the planned change process with organizations and communities.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the Belizean legal system and the various pieces of legislation that intersect with social work practice in Belize. The course examines some of the many critical perspectives on law, the legal system and the legal processes that interact with our professional practice. It explores the roles of the actors within the system and special attention is given to those roles played by the social services practitioner, including those of investigator, guardian ad litem, advocate and witness. The social work practice issues that arise from fulfilling these various roles will be examined and students will be taught practical skills such as court advocacy and report writing that will assist in the successful fulfillment of these roles. Students will be sensitized to the various ethical, human and cultural diversity issues that arise from practice within the legal system.

Social Work supervision introduces students to concepts of supervision, stages of development, and skills for effective leadership as a supervisor. The course covers theoretical models used in supervision and those for working with client systems; while reviewing the context of supervision, legal and regulatory issues in supervision, ethical concerns, technology, outcomes, evaluation, and termination. Emphasis is placed on understanding roles, functions, and practice within a generalist framework grounded in social work ethical practice.